Category: Press Release

Press Release: Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Interim Committee pass motion requesting courts hold off implementing new policy

Press Release
For Immediate Release
September 22, 2017

Contact:
Aundrea Peterson
Majority Director of Communications
Utah House of Representatives
801-791-3365 | aundreapeterson@le.utah.gov

Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Interim Committee pass motion requesting courts hold off implementing new policy

SALT LAKE CITY – Upon review of the House Interim Rules, the Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel (LRGC) has determined that a motion voted upon by the Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Interim Committee on Wednesday, calling upon Utah’s Courts to delay implementation of using Public Safety Assessment tools, did actually pass.

Representative Paul Ray expressed concern during the committee meeting and made a motion requesting that the courts wait to make such a major policy change until the Legislature would have time to review it. Rep. Ray’s motion passed the House by a majority vote and tied in the Senate, 2-2. Initially, the LRGC ruled that the motion had failed.

In January, the Utah Judicial Council approved use of a bail-alternative process which establishes a public-safety assessment (PSA) score based on an algorithm. Under the new rule, judges are permitted to determine to use the PSA score instead of using the probable cause statements that are filed by the arresting officer when deciding if a suspect should be released.

It is scheduled to go into effect on Nov. 13, 2017, although the Utah Legislature won’t have had a chance to review this policy change prior to the next general session in January 2018.

“Courts should come to the legislature when considering a drastic policy change,” said Rep. Ray. “The court’s authority is to ensure the law is being upheld not create new laws that could have an adverse effect on our community without public hearings and debate.”

Article VIII, Section 4 of the Utah Constitution states, “The Legislature may amend the Rules of Procedure and Evidence adopted by the Supreme Court upon a vote of two-thirds of all members of both houses of the Legislature.”

A PSA score is a computer-generated scoring system created by the Texas-based foundation of billionaire John Arnold and his wife Laura. The foundation advocates for criminal justice reform and other social issues and provides its PSA tool to any jurisdictions that request it. Nine risk factors are plugged into it, including criminal history, age, current charges and past charges. The tool then creates a score for a judge to consider.

The foundation says the algorithm generates gender-and-race-neutral “evidence-based data” on which defendants should be released before trial offering judges “reliable, predictive information about the risk that a defendant released before trial will engage in violence, commit a new crime, or fail to return to court.” Judicial systems in two states and 29 counties — including Chicago, Houston, San Francisco and Phoenix — are using the Arnold Foundation PSA scoring tool.

The algorithm has generated plenty of controversy in the wake of its implementation, however, most recently in San Francisco, where opponents are blaming it for the murder of a professional film and TV scout during a petty robbery. The PSA tool recommended that one of the man’s two assailants was a candidate for pretrial release despite his being a convicted felon and a two-time parole violator, who had also been arrested for gun possession only five days prior to the killing.

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Press Release: Utah research facility leading the way in groundbreaking technology

Press Release
For Immediate Release
July 31, 2017

Utah research facility leading the way in groundbreaking technology
Transportation Interim Committee hear from experts on autonomous control vehicles

SALT LAKE CITY – Members of the Transportation Interim Committee recently visited Utah State University and areas around Cache Valley to see technology being devolved and implemented in cars, trucks and other vehicles around the world.

Self-driving-autonomous vehicles are close to becoming a reality. Committee members saw demonstrations of the significant advancements made in autonomous technology. Leading experts and researchers from Utah State University informed legislators that the progress could lead to more efficient transportation, provide mobility to more Americans and potentially achieve substantial improvements in safety.

“This revolutionary technology is changing the world,” said Rep. Robert Spendlove. “Regulations for autonomous vehicles is being and will continue to be addressed by federal and local governments. I want to make certain Utah regulations enhance the development of this technology not hinder it.”

Autonomous features are already being integrated into vehicles to help drivers avoid or mitigate crashes. Such features include lane and brake assist, forward-collision warning and adaptive cruise control, which automatically maintains a safe following distance.

“Utah has experts leading this groundbreaking research,” said Rep. Mike Schultz, co-chair of the Transportation Interim Committee. “I appreciate Rep. Spendlove taking the time to lead this effort so committee members can see this technology first-hand and better prepare for the future.”

Additionally, USU has the only Electric Vehicle and Roadway facility in the country. Similar research facilities are in development or operation in Sweden, France and South Korea. During the visit, committee members witnessed USU’s fully electric 20-passenger bus – referred to as the ‘Aggie Bus’ – drive around the 1⁄4-mile test track at about 30 MPH.

The Aggie Bus is equipped with an autonomous control kit from Autonomous Solutions Inc., a spin-off of USU, and in-motion inductive wireless battery charging, developed at USU. This technology allows wireless power transfer from multiple concrete embedded primary pads/coils in the roadway to vehicle-mounted coils and battery systems to charge the vehicle while driving.

Researchers are aiming for fully electric vehicles, enabled with autonomous control and charged through electric roads. With these technologies vehicles can charge while in-motion and drive without human control. Drivers also have the ability to take over at any time and operate on standard roads. Autonomous control is a key enabler and is required to identify inductive power transfer coils embedded in the roadway and to align automatically under various road and weather conditions.

Further technological development at USU is aiming to advance energy storage in electric vehicles by increasing battery lifetime 30 to 45 percent. The improvements can reduce the cost and weight of vehicle battery systems and improve residual value for second life applications. The technologies are being evaluated by major automotive original equipment manufacturers for future electric vehicles.

 

Contact:
Aundrea Peterson
Majority Director of Communications
Utah House of Representatives
801-791-3365 | aundreapeterson@le.utah.gov

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Press Release: Utah Legislative Committee Recommends John Cannon for Director of Legislative Research Office

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 26, 2017

 UTAH LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS JOHN CANNON AS DIRECTOR OF LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH OFFICE
Veteran legislative staffer, community leader, and public affairs director to return to OLRGC

SALT LAKE CITY – Today, Utah Senate President Wayne Niederhauser and Utah House Minority Leader Brian King announced that the hiring subcommittee of the Utah Legislature unanimously recommends that John Q. Cannon assume leadership of the Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel (OLRGC). 

John Cannon served the Utah State Legislature for over two decades, first as an analyst, then rising to the leadership position of Managing Policy Analyst for OLRGC. Cannon was recognized for his vast knowledge of the legislative process, leadership ability, willingness to innovate, and for encouraging greater citizen participation in government. Cannon left OLRGC in 2012 to work for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, where he currently serves as the Director of Community and Government Affairs.

House Minority Leader, and co-chair of the hiring committee Brian King said, “I look forward to John’s leadership at OLRGC. He brings to the job excellent experience from prior service in that office as well as government relations work in the private sector.  His integrity and commitment to quality will allow the office to move forward on the foundation built by Mike Christensen.” 

Senate co-chair, Senate President Wayne Niederhauser said, “John is an innovator and a diplomat, with expert knowledge of legislative processes here in Utah and around the nation. He has the experience and leadership ability to get the work done. The choice was not easy.  We had a very strong group of applicants, but he rose to the top. If you were to craft an ideal skill set for this position, John Cannon has it.”

 As director, Cannon will succeed Michael Christensen, who has led the award-winning Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel since 2000.

 In 2012, John Cannon received a staff achievement award from the National Conference of State Legislators, which stated in part, “John possesses a unique array of superior technical skills combined with a first-rate political acumen and an unassuming and down-to-earth demeanor, great sense of humor, and compassion for others.”

 John Cannon holds a Bachelor of Arts degree and Master of Public Administration from Brigham Young University.

 The six-member Legislative Research Subcommittee is equally balanced between both political parties and both legislative chambers. Their recommendation will now go to the Legislative Management Committee for approval, then ratification by the full Utah State Legislature.

 # # #

CONTACTS:

 Greg Hartley
House Chief of Staff
801-231-2756 

Jen Jankowski
House Minority Legislative Staff Director
801-792-2330

Jon Hennington
Senate Minority Assistant
801-214-4611

Ric Cantrell
Senate Chief of Staff
801-647-8944

 

 

Press Release: Utah House Leaders Commend Secretary Zinke’s Interim Report on the Bears Ears National Monument

Press Release
For Immediate Release
June 12, 2017

Contact:
Aundrea Peterson
Majority Director of Communications
Utah House of Representatives
801-791-3365 | aundreapeterson@le.utah.gov

Utah House Leaders Commend Secretary Zinke’s Interim Report on the Bears Ears National Monument

SALT LAKE CITY – Today, the Trump Administration and U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke released their interim report on the Bears Ears National Monument.

Utah House leaders commend President Trump’s leadership, in tasking Secretary Zinke with a review of national monument designations under the Antiquities Act over the past two decades.

“It is refreshing to have an Administration that desires to collaborate with local officials, tribal leaders and citizens to generate optimum methods to manage our lands,” said Speaker Greg Hughes. “Western states have often been overlooked and ignored, but that has changed drastically since January.”

The new Administration welcomes the input of Utahns to discuss empirical alternatives to preserve our lands, while providing economic opportunities for those living in the area. This was demonstrated during Secretary Zinke’s recent four-day listening tour of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments.

Earlier this year, the Utah Legislature led efforts to encourage the federal government to allow more state control in the management of our lands. Speaker Hughes sponsored H.C.R. 11Concurrent Resolution Urging the President to Rescind the Bears Ears National Monument Designation, which urged the new administration to rescind the 1.35 million acre monument created by the previous administration in December 2016. Rep. Mike Noel sponsored H.C.R. 12Concurrent Resolution Urging Federal Legislation to Reduce or Modify the Boundaries of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, to allow greater use of the lands for locals and recreationists.

“Utah took a bold step in the fight to take back management control of our public lands,” said Rep. Noel. “As a result, Utahns were provided an opportunity to give their input, through public comment and meetings, on how to manage our lands in the future.”

The status of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is still under review. Public comment to the Department of the Interior is open until July 10.

The Utah State Legislature continues to work to preserve our lands through increased local management. Local control renders communities with the ability to enhance their economies in a sustainable way and adequately support residents and their families, provide a better education system, protect historic and culturally significant sites and reduce restrictions on recreational use of the land.

The Trump administration is taking steps to reduce federal overreach and bring some control back to state and local governments.

On June 8, 2017, Secretary Zinke signed Secretarial Order 3353, which aims to improve sage-grouse conservation and increase collaboration, cooperation and communication between federal and Western state governments. One-size-fits-all protection of sage grouse does not work because of the vastly different habitats in which the bird can be found. The review of the sage grouse plan provides states, and those closest to the issue, the opportunity to devise solutions that protect the ground-nesting bird without hindering local economic opportunities.

We were thrilled that Utah was able to add yet another strong official to this administration with the appointment of Greg Sheehan as the new Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Sheehan has a proven record and more than 25 years of experience in wildlife and natural resource management. He has earned respect from conservation organizations for his leadership, advocacy and dedication to preserving wildlife, and will be an effective leader in Washington.

We are excited to continue to work with Secretary Zinke and the rest of President Trump’s administration in this effort to preserve our lands, increase local management and provide economic prosperity for all citizens of Utah.

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Press Release: President Trump Signs Executive Order to Review National Monuments

Press Release
For Immediate Release
April 26, 2017

Contact:
Aundrea Peterson
Majority Director of Communications
Utah House of Representatives
801-791-3365 | aundreapeterson@le.utah.gov

President Trump Signs Executive Order to Review National Monuments

SALT LAKE CITY – Today, President Donald Trump signed an executive order to have Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke review national monument designations and the history of the Antiquities Act, which was never intended to lock up large swathes of land as it has been used over the past two decades. The intent of the Antiquities Act was to set aside only the smallest area necessary to protect significant archaeological or historical sites.

“I’m thankful we have a President that is sensitive to the needs of those of the West, of our great land and great people,” said Speaker Greg Hughes. “This is the first step in the process of reviewing Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monument designations to ensure that the antiquities are preserved, while keeping the lands accessible to the Native Americans and citizens.”

During the 2017 session, Speaker Hughes sponsored  H.C.R. 11, Concurrent Resolution Urging the President to Rescind the Bears Ears National Monument Designation. This concurrent resolution urged the new administration to remove the 1.35-million-acre monument designation made by the previous president shortly before leaving office.

“I’m grateful to live in a nation where things are not forced upon us by politicians that do not care and do not listen to what a majority of Utahns want,” said Speaker Hughes. “We now have a president that is willing to listen to the input of Utahns and discuss viable alternatives.”

Utah has endured two of the most controversial national monument designations in recent history. Nearly 70 percent of Utah is under federal management and control, and 90 percent of Utah’s population lives on just 1 percent of its land.

“The days of a president decreeing whatever he pleases despite the adverse effects it has on the people in the community are over,” said Speaker Hughes. “I am grateful that this President wants to be a partner with us in figuring out how best to preserve our lands while still providing economic opportunities for those residing in the area.”

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H.B. 199, High Needs Children Adoption Amendments

Adoption of High-Needs Children
Legislation Preventing Unregulated Custody Transfers

SALT LAKE CITY – H.B. 199, High Needs Children Adoption Amendments, sponsored by Representative Merrill Nelson, District 68, passed the House and the Senate. The intent of this legislation is to prevent parents who adopt high-needs children and later become overwhelmed with their care, from transferring custody of the adopted child to strangers through internet websites. Such informal transfers of custody often can result in the children being subjected to bondage, sex trafficking or other forms of abuse or neglect. This illegal practice, known as “rehoming,” is prohibited by the bill as an “unregulated custody transfer.”

This legislation requires full disclosure of the history of a high-needs child, available training about the challenging behavior and guidance about where parents can find additional assistance and resources. There will also be a penalty for those who engage in an unregulated custody transfer across state lines. Child Protective Services will have authority to investigate the safety of a child who has been subject to an unregulated custody transfer.

“Investigations of this practice reveal that 18,000 or more children, most of them adopted from foreign countries, have been given away to strangers by way of internet websites,” said Rep. Nelson. “Unfortunately, Utah families have been involved on one side or the other of this rehoming phenomenon.  We must act to protect these children from child predators and others who would harm them.”

The U.S. Department of State invited Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Department of Human Services, Children’s Bureau and the Administrators of the Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children to participate on a committee to help stop to unregulated custody transfers. Attorney General Reyes requested Rep. Nelson to run this legislation.

Attorney General Sean Reyes said, “We applaud the efforts of Rep. Nelson efforts. This bill provides adoptive parents more resources facing challenges with finding another adoptive family through legal processes. H.B. 199 is absolutely necessary to protect children and assist adoptive families. It allows the state to better educate and inform adoptive parents, empowering them to be more informed and prepared. With its passage, this bill will now provide a model for other states, and for that, we are truly grateful to Rep. Nelson for his work to pass this bill.”

This legislation is supported by the Utah Adoption Council and the Division of Child and Family Services.

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Press Release: Next steps for addressing Utah homeless crisis announced

Press Release
For Immediate Release
February 24, 2017

Contact:
Aundrea Peterson
Majority Director of Communications
Utah House of Representatives
aundreapeterson@le.utah.gov

Next steps for addressing Utah homeless crisis announced

SALT LAKE CITY – Today, Speaker of the House, state leadership and the mayors of Salt Lake County and City announced the next steps to address the homelessness crisis in Utah. The plan includes a new direction of the shelter model that breaks up the one-size-fits-all model into three resource centers— two in Salt Lake City and one located outside the city but in Salt Lake County.

“This proposal will allow us to move forward in our efforts to better serve those experiencing homelessness in Utah and relieves some of the pressure on Salt Lake City in providing those services. While the location and size of resource centers are changing slightly, what remains the same is the unprecedented level of cooperation and dedication among City, County, and State leaders in working with service providers to compassionately address this issue,” said Mayor Jackie Biskupski.

“At the state’s request, we will provide options for locating a homeless resource center outside of Salt Lake City. We believe the framework of this plan as outlined today will make it possible to reach our Collective Impact goal of minimizing homelessness, enhancing public safety, meeting the needs of those in crisis and helping them return to stable and independent lives,” said Mayor Ben McAdams.

Next steps include:

  • Improvements in coordinating resources across the housing and homelessness delivery system.
  • Two facilities in Salt Lake City. Each facility will serve up to 200 individuals.
  • One facility to be located outside of Salt Lake City is scheduled to be selected by March 30, 2017.
  • The current downtown shelter is anticipated to close by June 30, 2019.

A new bill sponsored by Rep. Francis Gibson will be presented to finalize funding for the new centers, which will utilize the process created under H.B. 436 Housing and Homelessness Reform Initiative from 2016. Under the direction of the State Homeless Coordinating Committee, the Department of Workforce Services will continue to work closely with the County and City to ensure funds are used as directed by the legislation and the approved plan.

“As I mentioned in my opening day remarks at the start of this session I’m drawing a line in the sand.  Homelessness and the criminal element that is preying on the most vulnerable amongst us is a statewide issue. One city, one county and the state alone can’t take this on by itself. We’ve come together in a collaborative effort, we’ve listened to concerns, and we’ve come up with a unified plan to reform this issue and address this crisis. It hasn’t been easy, and we are just getting started, but together we are committed to make this right and reform the way we address this crisis,” said Speaker Greg Hughes.

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NOTES:

  1. The homelessness proposal can be found here: http://www.utahreps.net/press/homelessness-proposal

 

 

 

 

Press Release: Lowering Blood Alcohol Content Levels From .08 to .05

Press Release
For Immediate Release
December 30, 2016

Contact:
Aundrea Peterson
Majority Communications Coordinator
Utah House of Representatives
801-791-3365
aundreapeterson@le.utah.gov

Lowering Blood Alcohol Content Levels From .08 to .05
Rep. Norm Thurston’s proposed DUI legislation for upcoming session

SALT LAKE CITY – As Utahns get ready to celebrate New Years Eve, Rep. Norm Thurston, District 64, is preparing to sponsor legislation for the 2017 General Session to lower the state’s legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels for driving under the influence from 0.08 to 0.05 for the general population.

“It’s a needed change for the whole country. It is well known that impairment begins with the first drink, but many drivers don’t realize that even low levels of BAC can degrade skills and increase the risk of crashes,” explains Rep. Thurston. “Lowering the legal limit will help reduce deaths, injuries and losses related to alcohol-impaired driving. More drivers will become aware that there is a significant increase in risk that occurs well before reaching 0.08.”

Legal limits at or below 0.05 are common throughout the world. Most European nations have a 0.05 legal limit, including Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain and Switzerland according to European Transport Safety Council. Examples of other countries with limits at or below 0.05 include Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Cambodia, China, Costa Rica, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Japan, Nepal, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Philippines, South Africa, South Korea, Thailand and Uruguay. Countries, such as the Czech Republic and Hungary, have 0.00 limits on BAC for general population drivers. Across the U.S., typically BAC for commercial drivers is 0.04.

“Utah can lead the way as the first state to lower the legal limit to 0.05 for the general population,” said Rep. Thurston. “This will make it more clear that drinking and driving is not acceptable. Furthermore, implementing this new standard can be done with minimal disruption to current law enforcement procedures, making this a win-win for the safety of Utahns on the road.”

In Utah, drunk driving is the third most common factor contributing to motor vehicle crash deaths over the past 10 years, with speed being first and unrestrained occupants being second.

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Jonathan Ball Honored with Steven D. Gold Award

Utah Budgeteer Honored with Steven D. Gold Award

Washington, D.C. – The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) presented Jonathan Ball, the chief budget staffer for the Utah Legislature, with the Steven D. Gold Award at NCSL’s Capitol Forum in Washington on Thursday.

The Gold Award honors individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of state and local finance, especially those that erase boundaries between academics and public policy.

“Jonathan exemplifies what the Gold Award is all about,” said NCSL Executive Director William Pound. “He strives to bridge the worlds of academia and government so that citizens enjoy thoughtful, informed and practical laws and programs.”

Ball is the director of Utah’s Legislative Fiscal Analyst and leads a team of 25 economists, accountants, financial analysts and support staff who help legislators craft the state budget each year. He has contributed to several academic publications, is a frequent guest lecturer at colleges and universities in Utah and regularly presents on budget issues for national organizations, including NCSL. He served as president of the National Association of Legislative Fiscal Offices and the Western States Legislative Fiscal Officers Association. He is currently staff co-chair of NCSL’s Standing Committees and a member of the NCSL Executive Committee.

“Legislative staffers typically prefer to toil away in anonymity,” said Ball, “but this recognition is welcome and especially meaningful because it reflects what my team and I strive for on a daily basis – objective, accurate and relevant budget advice. I’m humbled and honored to receive it on behalf of my family, friends and colleagues without whom it would not have happened.”

The award was established in 1997 in the memory of Steven D. Gold, an accomplished economist, academic and public finance expert. Gold was an active member of NCSL, the National Tax Association and the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. It is given each year by one of these organizations on a three-year rotation.

Since its inception, Ball is the second Utahn to receive the Gold Award. The National Tax Association presented it to Brigham Young University professor Gary Corina in 2006. It is the second national award Utah has been given for good fiscal management in recent months. Governing Magazine named Kristen Cox, budget director for Governor Gary Herbert, Public Servant of the Year in November.

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Press Release: Utah House Announces Extended Leadership Team and 2017/18 Committee Assignments

Press Release
For Immediate Release
December 6, 2016

 Utah House Announces Extended Leadership Team and 2017/18 Committee Assignments

Salt Lake City – After a comprehensive review of upcoming policy objectives and expertise of house members, Speaker Hughes announced the 2017/2018 extended majority leadership team and committee appointments. The new committee chair assignments have been well received as an opportunity to grow and tackle an aggressive agenda. The committee appointments are based on interest and expertise of members and, in some instances, will allow a fresh perspective on issues in all areas that will benefit the State.

“The work ahead of us is too important for this to be a status-quo session,” said Speaker Hughes. “This was a comprehensive effort made to ensure we make significant progress for our constituents and to have Utah continue to lead the nation. I am proud of the work we do in the House and that we let good information drive good decisions.  We are prepared to address the challenges and opportunities facing our state.”

Speaker Hughes reappointed Rep. Dean Sanpei to continue to serve as Chair of Executive Appropriations, he appointed Rep. Brad Last to serve as Executive Appropriations Vice-Chair and reappointed Rep. Michael Noel to continue in his role as Rules Committee Chair.

The two-year assignments will begin January 1st, 2017.

Utah House of Representatives New Standing and Appropriations Committee members for the upcoming legislative session are as follows:

House of Representatives 2017/18 Standing Committees

A Committees

Business & Labor

  • Jim Dunnigan, Chair
  • Marc Roberts, Vice Chair
  • Susan Duckworth
  • Gage Froerer
  • Adam Gardiner
  • Tim Hawkes
  • John Knotwell
  • Mike McKell
  • Jeremy Peterson
  • Mike Schultz
  • Jon Stanard
  • Curt Webb
  • Mark Wheatley
  • Brad Wilson

Health & Human Services

  • Brad Daw, Chair
  • Mike Kennedy, Vice Chair
  • Stewart Barlow
  • Rebecca Chavez-Houck
  • Craig Hall
  • Sandra Hollins
  • Kelly Miles
  • Paul Ray
  • Ed Redd
  • Robert Spendlove
  • Norm Thurston
  • Ray Ward

Education

  • Val Peterson, Chair
  • Kim Coleman, Vice Chair
  • LaVar Christensen
  • Bruce Cutler
  • Justin Fawson
  • Francis Gibson
  • Eric Hutchings
  • Brad Last
  • Dan McCay
  • Carol Spackman Moss
  • Mike Noel
  • Derrin Owens
  • Marie Poulson
  • Lowry Snow

Public Utilities & Technology

  • Steve Handy, Chair
  • Merrill Nelson, Vice Chair
  • Carl Albrecht
  • Patrice Arent
  • Walt Brooks
  • Scott Chew
  • Kay Christofferson
  • Keith Grover
  • Lynn Hemingway
  • Cory Maloy
  • Keven Stratton

B Committees

Judiciary

  • Mike McKell, Chair
  • Lowry Snow, Vice Chair
  • Kim Coleman
  • Bruce Cutler
  • Brian Greene
  • Ken Ivory
  • Brian King
  • Karianne Lisonbee
  • Dixon Pitcher
  • Susan Pulsipher
  • Tim Quinn
  • Mark Wheatley

Law Enforcement & Criminal Justice

  • Lee Perry, Chair
  • Ed Redd, Vice Chair
  • Becky Edwards
  • Steve Eliason
  • Adam Gardiner
  • Sandra Hollins
  • Eric Hutchings
  • Kelly Miles
  • Paul Ray
  • Angela Romero
  • Elizabeth Weight
  • Mike Winder

Natural Resources, Agriculture & Environment

  • Keven Stratton, Chair
  • Stewart Barlow, Vice Chair
  • Joel Briscoe
  • Scott Chew
  • Susan Duckworth
  • Steve Handy
  • Tim Hawkes
  • Mike Noel
  • Derrin Owens
  • Doug Sagers
  • Scott Sandall
  • Christine Watkins
  • Logan Wilde

Transportation

  • Mike Schultz, Chair
  • Kay Christofferson, Vice Chair
  • Walt Brooks
  • Justin Fawson
  • Lynn Hemingway
  • Mike Kennedy
  • John Knotwell
  • Karen Kwan
  • Jeff Moss
  • Val Potter
  • Robert Spendlove
  • John Westwood

C Committees

Government Operations

  • Jeremy Peterson, Chair
  • Norm Thurston, Vice Chair
  • Patrice Arent
  • Rebecca Chavez-Houck
  • Brad Daw
  • Dan McCay
  • Merrill Nelson
  • Lee Perry
  • Val Peterson
  • Dean Sanpei

Political Subdivisions

  • Dixon Pitcher, Chair
  • Craig Hall, Vice Chair
  • Jim Dunnigan
  • Keith Grover
  • Karen Kwan
  • Val Potter
  • Marie Poulson
  • Susan Pulsipher
  • Marc Roberts
  • Ray Ward
  • Curt Webb
  • Elizabeth Weight
  • Logan Wilde

Revenue & Taxation

  • Steve Eliason, Chair
  • Doug Sagers, Vice Chair
  • Joel Briscoe
  • Gage Froerer
  • Brian Greene
  • Ken Ivory
  • Brian King
  • Karianne Lisonbee
  • Jeff Moss
  • Tim Quinn
  • Jon Stanard
  • Brad Wilson

Economic Development & Workforce Services

  • Becky Edwards, Chair
  • John Westwood, Vice Chair
  • Carl Albrecht
  • LaVar Christensen
  • Cory Maloy
  • Carol Spackman Moss
  • Angela Romero
  • Scott Sandall
  • Christine Watkins
  • Mike Winder

Other Standing Committees

Rules

  • Mike Noel, Chair
  • Jon Stanard, Vice Chair
  • Rebecca Chavez-Houck
  • Justin Fawson
  • Carol Spackman Moss
  • Val Peterson
  • Mike Schultz
  • Christine Watkins

Ethics

  • Doug Sagers, Chair
  • Patrice Arent, Co-Chair
  • Jim Dunnigan
  • Keith Grover
  • Mike Noel
  • Marie Poulson
  • Angela Romero
  • Mark Wheatley

Administrative Rules

  • Brian Greene, Chair
  • Kim Coleman
  • Carol Spackman Moss
  • Curt Webb
  • Mark Wheatley

Retirement & Independent Entities

  • LaVar Christensen, Chair
  • Tim Hawkes, Vice Chair
  • Susan Duckworth
  • Steve Eliason
  • Lynn Hemingway
  • Dan McCay
  • Jeff Moss
  • Lee Perry
  • Marie Poulson

House of Representatives 2017/18 Appropriations Subcommittees

Executive Appropriations

  • Dean Sanpei, Chair
  • Brad Last, Vice Chair
  • Greg Hughes
  • Brad Wilson
  • Francis Gibson
  • John Knotwell
  • Brian King
  • Joel Briscoe
  • Angela Romero
  • Sandra Hollins

Business, Economic Development & Labor

  • Curt Webb, Chair
  • Scott Sandall, Vice Chair
  • Stewart Barlow
  • Adam Gardiner
  • Carol Spackman Moss
  • Jeremy Peterson
  • Val Peterson
  • Elizabeth Weight
  • John Westwood
  • Brad Wilson

Social Services

  • Paul Ray, Chair
  • Ray Ward, Vice Chair
  • Carl Albrecht
  • Rebecca Chavez-Houck
  • Becky Edwards
  • Sandra Hollins
  • Mike Kennedy
  • Ed Redd
  • Christine Watkins

Executive Offices & Criminal Justice

  • Eric Hutchings, Chair
  • Bruce Cutler, Vice Chair
  • Jim Dunnigan
  • Brian King
  • Merrill Nelson
  • Tim Quinn
  • Angela Romero
  • Lowry Snow
  • Logan Wilde

Higher Education

  • Keith Grover, Chair
  • Derrin Owens, Vice Chair
  • Kim Coleman
  • Brad Daw
  • Karen Kwan
  • Kelly Miles
  • Val Potter
  • Jon Stanard
  • Mark Wheatley
  • Mike Winder

Public Education

  • Dan McCay, Chair
  • Robert Spendlove, Vice Chair
  • Patrice Arent
  • Joel Briscoe
  • LaVar Christensen
  • Steve Eliason
  • Justin Fawson
  • Francis Gibson
  • Brad Last
  • Karianne Lisonbee
  • Jeff Moss
  • Susan Pulsipher
  • Norm Thurston

Infrastructure & General Government

  • Gage Froerer, Chair
  • Walt Brooks, Vice Chair
  • Craig Hall
  • Lynn Hemingway
  • John Knotwell
  • Cory Maloy
  • Mike McKell
  • Dixon Pitcher
  • Marie Poulson
  • Doug Sagers
  • Mike Schultz

Natural Resources, Agriculture & Environmental Quality

  • Ken Ivory, Chair
  • Scott Chew, Vice Chair
  • Kay Christofferson
  • Susan Duckworth
  • Brian Greene
  • Steve Handy
  • Timothy Hawkes
  • Karen Kwan
  • Mike Noel
  • Lee Perry
  • Marc Roberts
  • Keven Stratton

Retirement & Independent Entities

  • LaVar Christensen, Chair
  • Tim Hawkes, Vice Chair
  • Susan Duckworth
  • Steve Eliason
  • Lynn Hemingway
  • Dan McCay
  • Jeff Moss
  • Lee Perry
  • Marie Poulson

*Updated 12/12/2016

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