Fireworks Restrictions – 2018

PROPOSED LEGISLATION FACT SHEET

During the 2017 fireworks season, questions were raised about the types of fireworks allowed, the number of days it is legal to use fireworks, fire prevention, and liability concerns. In order to address these issues in a balanced and appropriate manner, Rep. Dunnigan and Sen. Iwamoto worked together on legislation that balances these concerns with the desire many Utahns have to be able to celebrate our most patriotic holidays with traditional displays of fireworks. This legislation is the result of numerous meetings with law enforcement, firefighters, fireworks retailers and manufacturers, citizens, and local elected officials.

A balanced approach

This legislation takes a balanced, bipartisan, and reasonable approach to addressing the many viewpoints on how and when fireworks should be allowed.

40% reduction in dates fireworks are allowed in July

  • Fireworks would be allowed on July 2-5 and July 22-25, instead of July 1-7 and July 21-27.
  • Fireworks would still be allowed on New Year’s Eve and Chinese New Year’s Eve.

Stronger penalties for shooting fireworks outside of permitted dates and times

  • Penalty for discharging fireworks when not permitted would be up to a $1,000 fine, an increase from $750. Violations would remain an infraction.

New penalty for igniting fireworks in restricted areas

  • Up to a $1,000 penalty and an infraction for discharging fireworks in an area where fireworks have been prohibited due to hazardous environmental conditions.

More local control

  • Provides clarity and increased flexibility to local governments and the state forester to prohibit the discharge of fireworks due to historic or current hazardous environmental conditions.

Easier to understand restrictions and penalties

  • Requires local governments and the state forester to create and provide maps showing where fireworks are prohibited due to hazardous environmental conditions.
  • Requires retailers to display maps that counties provide showing these restricted areas and display signs that indicate legal dates and times as well as criminal penalties and fines for violations.

Increased liability for causing a fire with fireworks

  • Civil liability for negligently, recklessly, or intentionally causing a fire with fireworks potentially includes any damages caused by the fire and any costs of suppressing the fire.

 

Notes:

Business and Labor Interim Committee voted unanimously to fast-track this legislation for consideration during 2018 General Session on Wednesday, November 15, 2017.

10 thoughts on “Fireworks Restrictions – 2018

  1. C. Wilcox July 19, 2018 at 1:42 pm - Reply

    Thank you very much! I hope that this will reduce the chances for injury and damage during Fireworks Dates. I appreciate any awareness that can be directed to Safety and Caution. On July 3rd, 2018, while attending a family fireworks show in front of my home, as a spectator 30 ft. away, I was struck by a LEGAL Aerial Firework that tipped over and exploded near my ear. The blast disoriented me so that I was not aware of being on fire. It put a whole through my eardrum, my hearing will hopefully return in time. The burns on my face and neck are still painful but are healing. I feel lucky to have my sight and grateful that no one else was injured, as it fired in a moving circle before ending. I hope to again raise awareness of the dangers and guidelines when using Fireworks. As new types of Fireworks and especially Aerials have increased in sales and popularity, we need to re-educate our family and friends about correctly using them and respecting all safety procedures. Often becoming to familiar with something creates a false sense of security and our caution tends to lessen.

  2. C. Wilcox July 19, 2018 at 1:38 pm - Reply

    Thank you very much! I am thankful that this will reduce the chances for injury and damage during Fireworks Dates. I appreciate any awareness that can be directed to Safety and Caution. On July 3rd, 2018, while attending a family fireworks show in front of my home, as a spectator 30 ft. away, I was struck by a LEGAL Aerial Firework that tipped over and exploded near my ear. The blast disoriented me so that I was not aware of being on fire. It put a whole through my eardrum, my hearing will hopefully return in time. The burns on my face and neck are still painful but are healing. I feel lucky to have my sight and grateful that no one else was injured, as it fired in a moving circle before ending. I hope to again raise awareness of the dangers and guidelines when using Fireworks. As new types of Fireworks and especially Aerials have increased in sales and popularity, we need to re-educate our family and friends about correctly using them and respecting all safety procedures. Often becoming to familiar with something creates a false sense of security and our caution tends to lessen.

  3. Vickie July 4, 2018 at 10:21 am - Reply

    I remember back in 2010 when they decided to allow firework the entire month of July. It was the worst month ever. Our dogs we’re a wreck, we were a wreck because of no sleep and dealing with our dogs. It was absolutely horrible. I would love to see fireworks banned other than the firework shows. I only see them as a fire starter and more sleepless nights and the pet shelters fill up because our poor pets are horrified and have no clue what’s going on. Thanks for changing the laws back to only a few days. It’s made our life lots better but keep in mind banning them would make our lives completely better. Have a safe and happy 4th.

  4. Tammy July 2, 2018 at 1:40 pm - Reply

    Matt MacPherson it is very reasonable considering they could ban fireworks altogether. Also it is enforceable if your neighbors call the police on you like I would if it were my neighbors. Sounds mean but I think it is reasonable considering fireworks start fires every year costing our state $$$$$$$. I have asthma and anytime there are fires near it flares it’s ugly head by cutting off my capacity to breath without an inhaler. I have to constantly use myinhaler .

  5. Gilbert Jorgensen July 2, 2018 at 7:20 am - Reply

    This is wonderful! Last year our neighborhood sounded like a war zone the entire month of July. People were shooting off fireworks in the streets past midnight on weekdays, with no consideration that the employed have jobs to go to the next morning.

    I feel especially sorry for our return soldiers dealing with PTSD.

    Thank you, again!

  6. Jeff June 30, 2018 at 12:06 pm - Reply

    This is BS people work during the week and the only time to let fireworks off is the weekend who evet made this law can kiss my a ss

  7. vcwhit June 4, 2018 at 8:11 am - Reply

    I feel having a restricted timeframe to light fireworks is great. I recently had to move to a new city due to eminent domain and I enjoy all the open space, however the houses are almost on top of each other. We had one neighborhood fire last year, because of fireworks. It only takes one spark and the neighborhood would light up. Not to mention the vetrans who suffer from PTSD, livestock and household pets who are in danger every year from fireworks. I wish fireworks were banned from this state because we live in a desert, or just lease it for the professionals to display. Just like cell phones in cars, people are not held accountable for their actions and leaves the ‘victim’ with the damages.

    • HingleMcCringleBerry(thepatriot) June 19, 2018 at 2:25 pm - Reply

      I don’t know why people have to be such dandies about these ridiculous firework laws. It has been a tradition for this country to celebrate it’s independence with war like explosions for many, many, years. I am sick and tired of the flocks of sheep that repeatedly ignore reality in order to agree with the personal and religious beliefs, and greed of the crooked politicians that run this once great country and state.
      Secondly, for the veterans of this country, with PTSD, they manage this disorder and are not all crazy as previously stated in one comment, and I’m pretty sure your pets and dwindling livestock will be fine.
      We do live in a desert and personal responsibility, which is lost on many, and does not require laws that protein to them to affect the rest of the state and nation. Let freedom rain and fireworks fly!

  8. Matt MacPherson May 19, 2018 at 8:28 am - Reply

    This ignores reality. Restricting firework days this year prevents weekend fireworks. This is unreasonable. It will be ignored and will be unenforceable. I have little kids who don’t want to miss a week of sleep too, but preventing us from shooting fireworks on the weekend is plain mean to those that enjoy the holiday.

  9. Lee and Dianne Johnson February 2, 2018 at 5:52 pm - Reply

    Thank you for your report. We appreciate your work in the legislature. We find you almost always right in line with our viewpoint. Keep up the good work.

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