Representatives visit University of Utah Health

Representatives have the opportunity to hear and see presentations about the remarkable effort that is being completed by many notable organizations, non-profits and companies during committee meetings. Though, to gain an even better understanding, Representatives at the Utah House want to not only just hear about it but also observe it. One of the best ways to learn more about the excellent services Utahns are performing is to personally experience an organizations environment and operation that takes place on a day to day basis.

Speaker Greg Hughes, Rep. Steve Eliason and DEA supervisory special agent Brian Besser visited the University of Utah Health (UofU Health) facilities on Thursday, Nov. 2. The purpose of the visit was to get a firsthand look at the exceptional work accomplished by the dedicated staff who are striving to provide excellent care to individuals often during one of the most challenging moments of their lives.

We appreciate the dedicated doctors, nurses, scientists and staff who thanklessly aim to provide the best care and service to Utahns and those in and around the country.

During the visit, they visited the Burn Trauma Intensive Care Unit, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), the AirMed team, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy and Entertainment Arts and Engineering department.

The dean of the College of Pharmacy discussed the cutting-edge 
opioid addiction research with a zebrafish that is being conducted to understand the drug-seeking behavior better. The purpose is to  come up with solutions to help fight this epidemic. Learn more about the study here.

 

The NICU combines highly trained healthcare professionals and advanced technology to provide care for the tiniest patients in need of intensive medical attention. The medical team works tirelessly and is a vital component for the health and developmental well-being of premature or sick infants. Babies delivered at 24 weeks have a 90 percent survival rate at the UofU Health NICU.

Treating burn injuries can be a challenging and lengthy process. The Burn Trauma Intensive Care Unit, which includes physicians, nurses, counselors and other caregivers, aims to provide access to the latest treatments as well as emotional and spiritual support to help patients and their families during the recovery process.

The Burn Center team cares for over 400 people a year and has about a 92.5 percent survival rate. Additionally, the Burn Center has gone more than four years without a central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). A reputable accomplishment. CLABSIs can result in thousands of deaths each year as well as add significant costs to the healthcare system.

The air medical transportation service, AirMed, is based out of the UofU Health’s Level 1 Trauma Center and is one of only three trauma level units in the state. AirMed has six helicopters and two airplanes located throughout Utah and Wyoming that are ready 24/7 to assist trauma, burns, pediatric, high-risk obstetrics and more.

Extensive training and experience are required even to be considered to join the top-notch AirMed team. Flight nurses have at least five years of experience in a Level 1 Facility. Flight medics have a minimum five years of experience. Flight respiratory therapists have a minimum of two years of experience in an ICU and ER at the UofU Health.  Additionally, AirMed is one of the only perinatal teams in the country staffed around the clock with a high-risk OB nurse, a neonatal nurse, and a perinatal respiratory therapist. The average crew member has 17 years of experience.

The goal of the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy is to expand the knowledge about developmental biology. It is also a valuable teaching tool for medical and dental students during the preclinical years. The department continues to grow. In the last three years, seven additional faculty members have joined the team.

The Entertainment Arts and Engineering program brings game developers and medical researchers together to develop innovative therapeutic apps and medical games. Projects include assisting in physical therapy for amputee patients, creating the ability for individuals to personalize control of a wheelchair and patient empowerment games.

The Utah State Legislature matched a private donation and appropriated $50 million for the Medical Education & Discovery Building. The project is projected to cost about $185 million. It will serve as an education and training hub for the UofU Health. Faculty, students and industry partners. They will be able to come together to create, test and implement solutions to challenging health problems.

UofU Health has more than 20,000 faculty and staff, is Utah’s only academic health system and it generates $77 million of state tax revenue.

Utah continues to rank as one of the top places for healthcare at the most affordable rate in the nation. This is due in large part to the dedicated doctors, nurses, scientists and staff.

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